Inflatables grab public attention

December 19th, 2016 / By: / Features

This design was done at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, an example of stands created for inflatables so they don’t need to be suspended from an overhead structure. Photo: Air Dimensional Design Inc.
This design was done at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, an example of stands created for inflatables so they don’t need to be suspended from an overhead structure. Photo: Air Dimensional Design Inc.

Companies and event organizers use inflatables to grab public attention and promote their brands.

Although he now sells spaces in luxury subterranean survival shelters, Robert Vicino once focused his entrepreneurial spirit on loftier altitudes. He put a 90-foot King Kong on the Empire State Building and designed Otto the Autopilot for the farcical movie Airplane. Most of his 12 patents involve inflatables.

Mark Bachman went to work for Vicino in 1981 and now runs his own inflatables company, Bigger Than Life, in San Diego, Calif. He credits Vicino with inventing an inflatable billboard extension (with optional internal lighting) that brings a third dimension to the ubiquitous flat plane of outdoor advertising.

Bigger Than Life’s product line includes billboard extensions as well as custom replicas of products and characters, games, displays and costumes.

“You can have a very large, very dominant advertisement piece that packs up into a small shipping container and doesn’t cost much to transport because it’s light,” Bachman says.

X-Treme Creations made a Hieronymus Bosch-inspired inflatable for the February 2016 opening of an exhibition marking the 500th anniversary of the painter’s death. This photo shows the fish with legs outside St. John’s Cathedral in the artist’s hometown of ’s-Hertogenbosch in The Netherlands. Photo: X-Treme Creations.
X-Treme Creations made a Hieronymus Bosch-inspired inflatable for the February 2016 opening of an exhibition marking the 500th anniversary of the painter’s death. This photo shows the fish with legs outside St. John’s Cathedral in the artist’s hometown of ’s-Hertogenbosch in The Netherlands. Photo: X-Treme Creations.

Doron Gazit, the co-inventor of dancing inflatables (Fly Guys®), founded Air Dimensional Design Inc. in 1986. The North Hollywood, Calif.-based company sells and rents a range of products, including Hi-Lights™ (illuminated shapes for standing and suspended décor), walls, arches, tubes and spheres.

“Inflatables can be very big, but 99 percent of them are just air,” he says. “Because they are so light, they easily can be attached to ceilings, trees and structures. At the same time, they are simple to ship and store. Even at 15 feet in diameter, they can fit into a big shoebox; in our warehouse, we have about 1,500 inflatables.”

And, he adds, they are easy to set up.

“Any technician can do it easily,” he says. “The big ones maybe take two people.”

Robert Crocker, CEO of New Zealand-based Canvasland, notes yet another advantage: “Inflatables are more lifelike than most other forms of branding media; 3-D is always more dynamic than 2-D,” he says. “They also become interactive. A 2-D banner is just saying something that the viewer can stop and look at. Inflatables offer the opportunity to wrap the person in a total engagement experience.”

Canvasland makes a range of promotional inflatables as well as inflatable structures, outdoor cinema screens and obstacle courses for pools.

Inflatables are popular for race start and finish lines, such as the one shown here in Huntington Beach, Calif., emblazoned with the Roxy name and photos of its fitness clothing. Photo: Bigger Than Life.
Inflatables are popular for race start and finish lines, such as the one shown here in Huntington Beach, Calif., emblazoned with the Roxy name and photos of its fitness clothing. Photo: Bigger Than Life.

The effects of inflation

“We have a number of customers that offer event management to corporate customers,” Crocker says. “Inflatables are a great way to draw in crowds to an interactive activity with branding all over it.

“Most of our event-based inflatables are used in New Zealand’s main city centers. However, many of them tour for nationwide events, and some even go on international tours,” Crocker adds, noting as an example 5-foot-diameter cricket balls and correspondingly sized bats for the Cricket World Cup 2015.

Product replicas for fast-food chains and beer conglomerates are bread-and-butter business for Bigger Than Life, which relies strictly on sales.

“Car dealers rent inflatables; that’s not our market,” Bachman says. “Our work is on the high-end, high-quality replica for a relatively small number of people’s ideas—300 to 400 a year.”

A crab draped over McCormick & Schmick’s in San Francisco, Calif., promotes the restaurant’s fresh seafood … vividly. Photo: Bigger Than Life.
A crab draped over McCormick & Schmick’s in San Francisco, Calif., promotes the restaurant’s fresh seafood … vividly. Photo: Bigger Than Life.

X-Treme Creations has delved into spectacles with projects for the Olympic Games, World Cup, Tour de France, Live Nation concerts, Tomorrowland music festival and performance brands Red Bull and Clif Bar. The Belgium-based company sells and rents a range of inflatables, including product replicas, characters, arches, tubes, furniture and display products for point-of-sale and other retail applications.

“We have put semi-permanent inflatables on the roofs of shopping malls and factories located along major highways,” owner Dan Vandevoorde says. “Trade-show exhibition stand builders are including more and more inflatable elements, gaining efficiency in complex and amorphous shapes with limited manpower during installation and transport.”

Air Dimensional Design also has provided inflatables for premier events like World Cups, Super Bowls and Olympic Games, as well as for Fortune 500 companies, including Microsoft and Coca-Cola.

After more than 30 years in business, Gazit says, “I can’t say that I’ve fulfilled my dreams, because I never dreamed I would be doing special effects on such a huge scale in so many countries.

“We are starting to put inflatables on scaffolding around buildings under construction,” he adds. He even did so on ten 75-foot scaffolding towers brought in during pre-construction when Mall of America architect Jon Jerde and the Sussman-Prejza branding consultants firm hired him to draw media attention to the groundbreaking of a building complex
in Dubai.

Primarily, Gazit’s company relies on monthly sales and rentals on a smaller scale—and, increasingly, for trade shows.

“Here the joke is that we love to do jobs wherever there is air,” he says.

Air Dimensional Design ran a series of AirTubes®, 150 to 200 feet long, from the top of the Pacific Design Center in Los Angeles, Calif., to attract attention for a fundraising event. The inflatables remained on display for six weeks. Photo: Air Dimensional Design Inc.
Air Dimensional Design ran a series of AirTubes®, 150 to 200 feet long, from the top of the Pacific Design Center in Los Angeles, Calif., to attract attention for a fundraising event. The inflatables remained on display for six weeks. Photo: Air Dimensional Design Inc.

Wrapping it up

When Gazit developed 60-foot dancing inflatables made of spinnaker ripstop nylon for the closing ceremonies of the 1996 Olympic Games, he needed a fabric that was more flexible than the parachute ripstop nylon he had been using for his stationary tubes.

“It had to be very strong and light,” he says. “There’s a lot of air moving through dancing tubes.”

Although the nature of the ripstop nylon and PVC that his company uses has remained the same, Gazit says, “Over time, we have found better and better fabrics. I am always looking for one that is thinner and more translucent.”

“Materials have changed dramatically,” Bachman concurs. “They’ve gotten significantly stronger for their weight.

“We use different fabrics [including PVC and vinyl-coated nylon] for many reasons, including size of the inflatable, ability to digitally print on the material, and the quality of the printing. If it’s helium, it should have a urethane coating to hold gas. We talk about materials as heavy (for larger inflatables that may get dragged around) as being 10 to 14 ounces, lighter weight as 5 to 7 ounces, and helium in the 4-ounce range.

An inflatable game for the V energy-drink brand, which sponsored a stage at the Auckland City Limits music festival. Festival-goers donned Velcro™ suits, jumped on a trampoline and stuck themselves as high as possible on the wall. Photo: Canvasland.
An inflatable game for the V energy-drink brand, which sponsored a stage at the Auckland City Limits music festival. Festival-goers donned Velcro™ suits, jumped on a trampoline and stuck themselves as high as possible on the wall. Photo: Canvasland.

“Over the last 10 years, ink adhesion has become very good,” Bachman continues. “We used to put a clear coat on everything; that’s no longer necessary.”

X-Treme Creations mostly uses uncoated polyester, but Vandevoorde says, “Basically, any fabric that can be printed, cut, stitched or welded is fine. We sometimes combine inflatables with polystyrene for very detailed and small shapes.”

For most inflatables, Canvasland uses PVC, which Crocker says is constantly changing.

“Manufacturers are increasing their range of colors, additives in their coatings and base-cloth strength,” he explains. “As these changes are introduced, we have to be vigilant on the adhesion quality, because that is very important for inflatables.

Air Dimensional Design is working on video-mapping projections on its inflatables, such as this installation in Dayton, Ohio, for a Wright Brothers anniversary celebration. Photo: Air Dimensional Design Inc.
Air Dimensional Design is working on video-mapping projections on its inflatables, such as this installation in Dayton, Ohio, for a Wright Brothers anniversary celebration. Photo: Air Dimensional Design Inc.

“Most PVC fabrics are not airtight. Airtight inflatables require specialized fabrics,” he says. “And because we use airtight inflatables for swimming pools, we also need good chemical resistance,” he adds. “We source specialized fabrics from around the world—some out of Germany, Israel and Korea. We are investigating new fabrics for airtight inflatables and having some great success with EVA [ethylene vinyl acetate].”

Canvasland works with artists who airbrush inflatables and with print companies that provide screen and digital printing.

“Over the last few years, digital printing has made branding so much easier and offered so many more options to what graphics we can give customers,” Crocker says. He has his own idea about what the “perfect” material would be for inflatables:

Because of the compaction and light weight of inflatables, organizers of the Tomorrowland music festival in Belgium could ship X-Treme Creations’ inflatable staging at low cost for the offshoot Tomorrowland Brasil 2016. Photo: X-Treme Creations.
Because of the compaction and light weight of inflatables, organizers of the Tomorrowland music festival in Belgium could ship X-Treme Creations’ inflatable staging at low cost for the offshoot Tomorrowland Brasil 2016. Photo: X-Treme Creations.

“I want to find a lightweight, airtight fabric that is chemically resistant to oils and chlorine, made with a coating that is recyclable, and able to be assembled using a sewing machine-style welder.”

Bachman notes how technology has streamlined the manufacturing process—from the days when Bigger Than Life had an art department with a staff of 25 and designing began with a clay model, to today’s use of pattern-making software. Every step in hand application held the possibility of error that could magnify with each subsequent step.

“We went from digital with fingers to digital with 1s and 0s in computer keys,” Bachman says. “In some ways, it’s great—and in others, not so good. I was really proud of the work we did in the ’80s and ’90s; it was real art.”

Janice Kleinschmidt is a magazine editor and freelance writer based in San Diego, Calif.

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