Cont ed

Fabric pocket with cable. Used with PVC-coated polyester fabric or PTFE-coated fiberglass fabric (must be restricted by the length of the fabric seam. If the forces get too large, it would be better to use the edge cable with clamps method, shown next.)
Fabric pocket with cable. Used with PVC-coated polyester fabric or PTFE-coated fiberglass fabric (must be restricted by the length of the fabric seam. If the forces get too large, it would be better to use the edge cable with clamps method, shown next.)

Continuous learning is required to stay competitive in the profession and to serve your clients most effectively. Fabric Architecture magazine provides this opportunity by partnering with the Fabric Structures Association, an official provider of the American Institute of Architecture (AIA) Continuing Education System (CES).

The articles in this section have corresponding tests that architects can take to earn CES credits. All of these tests are available in an interactive format, by clicking on the link for the Continuing Education Test in each article.


  • AIA CES approved course from FSA

    Sponsored by Fabric Structures Association

    The Fabric Structures Association promotes the use and growth of fabric structures in the Americas. FSA has an AIA/CES approved course on how fabric structures that use fabric can be incorporated into your designs. It lists the types of fabric structures, materials used in these structures and describes the history of fabric structures. After completion of this course, participants will be able to:
    - Understand what lightweight structures are.
    - Comprehend different types of structures and their uses.
    - Understand energy and sustainability issues in regards to these structures.
    - Grasp the basic design process.
    - Understand the different materials used in fabric structures.
    - Identify the advantages of using fabrics as a building material.